Beware the oak

 

No. of Strikes
1874-1890

% of forest
by species

% of all Strikes

Oaks

310

11

58

Scots Pine

108

6

20

Spruce

39

12

7

Beech

33

69

6

Larch

11

1

2

Birch

10

1

2

Poplar

6

1

1

Ash

4

1

0.7

Willow

2

1

0.3

Austrian Pine

1

1

0.2

Weymouth Pine

1

1

0.2

Other

13

1

2

Total

538

 

 

Count by Dr. Hess in Lippe-Detmold Forest

[Royal Meteo. Soc. Quart. Journal 33:255. 1907]

I need an arboreal type to help me explain the lopsided numbers in this data set. Mr. Jonesco of the Wurttemberg Society of Natural Science. To measure the electrical conductivity of various trees, Mr. Hess used Holz’s electric machine. He found that oak wood was a good conductor, beech a poor conductor, and Poplars and willows were in the intermediate category. Neither heart nor soft wood nor moisture content were not helpful variables.

In an effort to normalize between various woodlands, the frequency counts for Beech were set to a value of 1.0 and other species  adjusted proportionally. 

  • Oak was most often struck in all the forests examined
  • Deep rooted species were struck more often than shallow-rooted species
  • Trees growing on a loam soil were more vulnerable to lightning strikes than those growing in sand or clay soils
  • Flooded forest were the least “bothered”

KNOWLEDGE-WISE THIS IS ALL THIN GRUEL. HELP?

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